Characterization of calcium-binding sites in development-specific protein S of Myxococcus xanthus using site-specific mutagenesis

M. Teintze, M. Inouye, S. Inouye

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32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Protein S, the most abundant protein synthesized during development of the Gram-negative bacterium Myxococcus xanthus, assembles on the surface of the spores. It can be dissociated from the spores using divalent metal chelators and will reassemble on the spores in the presence of calcium. The amino acid sequence of protein S contains regions which have homology to the calcium-binding sites of calmodulin. Protein S was found to bind 2 mol of calcium/mol of protein with K(d) values of 27 and 76 μM. Using oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis, the gene coding for protein S was changed in each of two regions of homology to calmodulin (Ser40 → Arg,Ser129 → Arg), and a double mutant was also constructed. Each mutant gene was then transduced into the genome of a M. xanthus strain from which the wild-type genes had been deleted. All three mutants produced protein S normally during development. One of the mutants (Ser129 → Arg) had normal amounts of protein S on its spores, whereas the other (Ser40 → Arg) bound much less and the double mutant had virtually none. Analysis of the calcium binding affinities of the purified proteins showed that [Arg40]protein S and [Arg40, Arg129]protein S did not bind detectable quantities of calcium, whereas [Arg129]protein S bound less calcium than the wild-type protein and with a reduced affinity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1199-1203
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume263
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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