Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk

Susan E. Olivo-Marston, Ping Yang, Leah E. Mechanic, Elise D. Bowman, Sharon Pine, Christopher A. Loffredo, Anthony J. Alberg, Neil Caporaso, Peter G. Shields, Stephen Chanock, Yanhong Wu, Ruoxiang Jiang, Julie Cunningham, Jin Jen, Curtis C. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke during adulthood has detrimental health effects, including increased lung cancer risk. Compared with adults, children may be more susceptible to secondhand smoke. This susceptibility may be exacerbated by alterations in inherited genetic variants of innate immunity genes. We hypothesized a positive association between childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk that would be modified by genetic polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2) gene resulting in well-known functional changes in innate immunity. Methods: Childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk was assessed among men and women in the ongoing National Cancer Institute-Maryland Lung Cancer (NCI-MD) study, which included 624 cases and 348 controls. Secondhand smoke history was collected via in-person interviews. DNA was used for genotyping the MBL2 gene. To replicate, we used an independent case-control study from Mayo Clinic consisting of 461 never smokers, made up of 172 cases and 289 controls. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: In the NCI-MD study, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers [odds ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-4.90]. This was confirmed in the Mayo study (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.15). A functional MBL2 haplotype associated with high circulating levels of MBL and increased MBL2 activity was associated with increased lung cancer risk among those exposed to childhood secondhand smoke in both the NCI-MD and Mayo studies (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.13-5.60, and OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.18-3.85, respectively). Conclusions: Secondhand smoke exposure during childhood is associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers, particularly among those possessing a haplotype corresponding to a known overactive complement pathway of the innate immune system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3375-3383
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Mannose-Binding Lectin
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Lung Neoplasms
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Innate Immunity
Haplotypes
Genes
Genetic Polymorphisms
Case-Control Studies
Immune System
History
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Olivo-Marston, Susan E. ; Yang, Ping ; Mechanic, Leah E. ; Bowman, Elise D. ; Pine, Sharon ; Loffredo, Christopher A. ; Alberg, Anthony J. ; Caporaso, Neil ; Shields, Peter G. ; Chanock, Stephen ; Wu, Yanhong ; Jiang, Ruoxiang ; Cunningham, Julie ; Jen, Jin ; Harris, Curtis C. / Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 12. pp. 3375-3383.
@article{fa2f905e9ae74352ae4b14a96e8d52e4,
title = "Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk",
abstract = "Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke during adulthood has detrimental health effects, including increased lung cancer risk. Compared with adults, children may be more susceptible to secondhand smoke. This susceptibility may be exacerbated by alterations in inherited genetic variants of innate immunity genes. We hypothesized a positive association between childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk that would be modified by genetic polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2) gene resulting in well-known functional changes in innate immunity. Methods: Childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk was assessed among men and women in the ongoing National Cancer Institute-Maryland Lung Cancer (NCI-MD) study, which included 624 cases and 348 controls. Secondhand smoke history was collected via in-person interviews. DNA was used for genotyping the MBL2 gene. To replicate, we used an independent case-control study from Mayo Clinic consisting of 461 never smokers, made up of 172 cases and 289 controls. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: In the NCI-MD study, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers [odds ratio (OR), 2.25; 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI), 1.04-4.90]. This was confirmed in the Mayo study (OR, 1.47; 95{\%} CI, 1.00-2.15). A functional MBL2 haplotype associated with high circulating levels of MBL and increased MBL2 activity was associated with increased lung cancer risk among those exposed to childhood secondhand smoke in both the NCI-MD and Mayo studies (OR, 2.52; 95{\%} CI, 1.13-5.60, and OR, 2.78; 95{\%} CI, 1.18-3.85, respectively). Conclusions: Secondhand smoke exposure during childhood is associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers, particularly among those possessing a haplotype corresponding to a known overactive complement pathway of the innate immune system.",
author = "Olivo-Marston, {Susan E.} and Ping Yang and Mechanic, {Leah E.} and Bowman, {Elise D.} and Sharon Pine and Loffredo, {Christopher A.} and Alberg, {Anthony J.} and Neil Caporaso and Shields, {Peter G.} and Stephen Chanock and Yanhong Wu and Ruoxiang Jiang and Julie Cunningham and Jin Jen and Harris, {Curtis C.}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0986",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "3375--3383",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "12",

}

Olivo-Marston, SE, Yang, P, Mechanic, LE, Bowman, ED, Pine, S, Loffredo, CA, Alberg, AJ, Caporaso, N, Shields, PG, Chanock, S, Wu, Y, Jiang, R, Cunningham, J, Jen, J & Harris, CC 2009, 'Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 18, no. 12, pp. 3375-3383. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0986

Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk. / Olivo-Marston, Susan E.; Yang, Ping; Mechanic, Leah E.; Bowman, Elise D.; Pine, Sharon; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Caporaso, Neil; Shields, Peter G.; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Yanhong; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Cunningham, Julie; Jen, Jin; Harris, Curtis C.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 12, 01.12.2009, p. 3375-3383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk

AU - Olivo-Marston, Susan E.

AU - Yang, Ping

AU - Mechanic, Leah E.

AU - Bowman, Elise D.

AU - Pine, Sharon

AU - Loffredo, Christopher A.

AU - Alberg, Anthony J.

AU - Caporaso, Neil

AU - Shields, Peter G.

AU - Chanock, Stephen

AU - Wu, Yanhong

AU - Jiang, Ruoxiang

AU - Cunningham, Julie

AU - Jen, Jin

AU - Harris, Curtis C.

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke during adulthood has detrimental health effects, including increased lung cancer risk. Compared with adults, children may be more susceptible to secondhand smoke. This susceptibility may be exacerbated by alterations in inherited genetic variants of innate immunity genes. We hypothesized a positive association between childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk that would be modified by genetic polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2) gene resulting in well-known functional changes in innate immunity. Methods: Childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk was assessed among men and women in the ongoing National Cancer Institute-Maryland Lung Cancer (NCI-MD) study, which included 624 cases and 348 controls. Secondhand smoke history was collected via in-person interviews. DNA was used for genotyping the MBL2 gene. To replicate, we used an independent case-control study from Mayo Clinic consisting of 461 never smokers, made up of 172 cases and 289 controls. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: In the NCI-MD study, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers [odds ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-4.90]. This was confirmed in the Mayo study (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.15). A functional MBL2 haplotype associated with high circulating levels of MBL and increased MBL2 activity was associated with increased lung cancer risk among those exposed to childhood secondhand smoke in both the NCI-MD and Mayo studies (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.13-5.60, and OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.18-3.85, respectively). Conclusions: Secondhand smoke exposure during childhood is associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers, particularly among those possessing a haplotype corresponding to a known overactive complement pathway of the innate immune system.

AB - Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke during adulthood has detrimental health effects, including increased lung cancer risk. Compared with adults, children may be more susceptible to secondhand smoke. This susceptibility may be exacerbated by alterations in inherited genetic variants of innate immunity genes. We hypothesized a positive association between childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk that would be modified by genetic polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2) gene resulting in well-known functional changes in innate immunity. Methods: Childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk was assessed among men and women in the ongoing National Cancer Institute-Maryland Lung Cancer (NCI-MD) study, which included 624 cases and 348 controls. Secondhand smoke history was collected via in-person interviews. DNA was used for genotyping the MBL2 gene. To replicate, we used an independent case-control study from Mayo Clinic consisting of 461 never smokers, made up of 172 cases and 289 controls. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: In the NCI-MD study, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers [odds ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-4.90]. This was confirmed in the Mayo study (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.15). A functional MBL2 haplotype associated with high circulating levels of MBL and increased MBL2 activity was associated with increased lung cancer risk among those exposed to childhood secondhand smoke in both the NCI-MD and Mayo studies (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.13-5.60, and OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.18-3.85, respectively). Conclusions: Secondhand smoke exposure during childhood is associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers, particularly among those possessing a haplotype corresponding to a known overactive complement pathway of the innate immune system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73349117780&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73349117780&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0986

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0986

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 3375

EP - 3383

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 12

ER -