Collateral informant assessment in alcohol use research involving college students

Brett T. Hagman, Amy M. Cohn, Nora E. Noel, Patrick Clifford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the associations between college students' self-reported alcohol use and corresponding collateral reports and identified factors that influence agreement between both sets of reports. Participants/Methods: Subject-collateral pairs (N = 300) were recruited from undergraduate psychology courses. Results: Data yielded moderate correlations between subject-collateral pairs for all alcohol use measures, whereas discrepancy analyses revealed a tendency for subjects to report greater alcohol use relative to collateral reports. Greater subject-collateral agreement regarding frequency of subject alcohol use was predicted by a greater frequency of shared drinking occasions between the dyads, lower subject self-reported drug use, and lower levels of collateral guessing, whereas greater correspondence for quantity of alcohol consumed was predicted by fewer subject self-reported alcohol-related negative consequences, lower levels of subject self-reported drug use, and lower levels of alcohol ingestion among collaterals. Conclusions: College students appear to provide reasonably accurate self-reports of their alcohol use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-90
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

  • alcohol use
  • collateral
  • college students
  • correspondence
  • self-report

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Collateral informant assessment in alcohol use research involving college students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this