Conceptual environmental justice model for evaluating chemical pathways of exposure in low-income, minority, Native American, and other unique exposure populations

Joanna Burger, Michael Gochfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Risk assessment determines pathways, and exposures that lead to poor health. For exposures that fall disproportionately on urban low-income communities, minorities, and Native Americans, these pathways are often more common than in the general population. Although risk assessors often evaluate these pathways on an ad hoc basis, a more formal way of addressing these nonstandard pathways is needed to adequately inform public health policy. A conceptual model is presented for evaluating nonstandard, unique, or excessive exposures, particularly for environmental justice communities that have an exposure matrix of inhalation, dermal, ingestion, and injection. Risk assessment can be improved by including nonstandard and unique exposure pathways as described in this conceptual model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S64-S73
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume101
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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