Corrigendum: Characterizing large-scale meteorological patterns and associated temperature and precipitation extremes over the northwestern United States using selforganizing maps [J. Climate, 30, (2017) (2829-2847)] DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0670.1

Paul C. Loikith, Benjamin R. Lintner, Alex Sweeney

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

Abstract

The authors of Loikith et al. (2017) have noted a computational error affecting Figs. 15a and 15d in the published version of the paper. The corrected panels are displayed below in the corrected Fig. 15. For Spokane, Washington (Fig. 15a), the relationship between daily precipitation amount and self-organizing map (SOM) node assignment was shown to be weak in the published version and this conclusion does not change with the correction. For Astoria, Oregon (Fig. 15d), the relationship between temperature and SOM node assignment was shown to be weak in the published version and this conclusion does change in the corrected version. As is evident in Fig. 15d, there is a notable relationship between daily temperature and SOM node assignment. In particular, node 12 shows a strong relationship with extreme warm temperatures, with nodes 4 and 8 also showing a similar but weaker relationship. Node-12 days are associated with a high frequency of extreme warm temperatures mainly west of the Cascade Range (Loikith et al. 2017), indicating an influence of downslope warming driven by offshore winds under a broad 500-hPa ridge. This effect is maximized at the coast, resulting in the most extreme warm days in Astoria. Many extreme warm days also occur with node 8 at Astoria, which is generally associated with the most anomalous warmth across the domain; however, results suggest that node-12 days are more often characterized by strong offshore winds at the coast that inhibit the moderating influences of the nearby Pacific Ocean while aiding in adiabatic downslope warming. In the published version of the paper, the authors state that Astoria may represent a limitation on the SOMs approach and hypothesize that this may be due to small-scale local circulation having a larger influence on temperature at this coastal location than synoptic-scale patterns as captured with the SOMs approach. While local-scale influences are likely important for temperature in Astoria given its proximity to the Pacific Ocean, Fig. 15d demonstrates that the SOMs approach is effective at identifying the large-scale meteorological patterns associated with local-scale extremes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8031-8032
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume30
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

Keywords

  • Atmosphere
  • Climate variability
  • Dynamics
  • North America
  • Synoptic climatology
  • Synoptic-scale processes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Corrigendum: Characterizing large-scale meteorological patterns and associated temperature and precipitation extremes over the northwestern United States using selforganizing maps [J. Climate, 30, (2017) (2829-2847)] DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0670.1'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this