Cortical activity changes as related to oral irritation-an fNIRS study

Tianjiao Zeng, Debbie Peru, Venda Porter Maloney, Laleh Najafizadeh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We present the first investigation of how the cortical regions of the brain respond to the sensations related to oral irritation, using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). fNIRS is used to record irritant-induced activities in the prefrontal and somatosensory regions of nine healthy individuals. Two types of solutions, irritant-free and soft tissue-irritant-contained, are adopted as the stimuli for the control and task experiments, respectively. Our findings reveal that both somatosensory and prefrontal regions show activity as a result of oral irritation. Furthermore, using moving window analysis, we identify the time interval during which the largest number of channels (indicative of high involvement of cortical regions) show irritant-induced activity. Our results indicate that fNIRS can be used to study brain activities related to oral irritation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationSmarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages2558-2561
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781509028092
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2017
Event39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2017 - Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Jul 11 2017Jul 15 2017

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2017
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityJeju Island
Period7/11/177/15/17

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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