Coupled early Pliocene-middle Miocene bio-cyclostratigraphy of site 1006 reveals orbitally induced cyclicity patterns of Great Bahama Bank carbonate production

D. Kroon, T. Williams, C. Pirmez, S. Spezzaferri, T. Sato, J. D. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Detailed biostratigraphy in Site 1006 based on planktonic foraminifers and nannofossils shows large-scale sedimentation rate variability in the Florida Strait west of the Great Bahama Bank. A 'floating' cyclostratigraphy based mainly on resistivity logs and magnetic susceptibility data has been fixed to the biostratigraphy in the absence of magnetostratigraphy. The strongest orbital cycle present is the precessional beat, which is present in the borehole logs throughout the record. Counting the cycles resulted in an accurate time scale and thus a sedimentation rate time series. Spectral analysis of the sedimentation rate time series shows that the short-term cycle of eccentricity (~125 k.y.) and the long term cycle of eccentricity (~400 k.y.) are pervasive throughout the Miocene record, together with the long-term ~2-m.y. eccentricity cycle. The Great Bahama Bank produced pulses of shallow carbonate input once every precessional (sea level) cycle during the Miocene and perhaps two pulses per cycle in the early Pliocene. The amount of sediment exported in these pulses appears to be controlled by eccentricity modulation of the precessional amplitude and therefore the amplitude of the sea-level rise. Finally, an increase in sedimentation rate just after the Miocene/Pliocene boundary is attributed to a change in the location and strength of sediment drift currents in the Florida Strait due to reorganization of the currents following the closure of the Panama Isthmus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-166
Number of pages12
JournalProceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program: Scientific Results
Volume166
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oceanography
  • Geology

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