Cultural capital and transnational parenting: The case of Ghanaian migrants in the United States

Cati Coe, Serah Shani

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

What does cultural capital mean in a transnational context? In this article, Cati Coe and Serah Shani illustrate through the case of Ghanaian immigrants to the United States that the concept of cultural capital offers many insights into immigrants' parenting strategies, but that it also needs to be refined in several ways to account for the transnational context in which migrants and their children operate. The authors argue that, for many immigrants, the folk model of success means that they seek for their children skills, knowledge, and ways of being in the world that are widely valued in the multiple contexts in which they operate. For Ghanaian migrants, parenting includes using social and institutional resources from Ghana as well as the United States. The multiplicity and contradictions in cultural capital across different social fields complicate their parenting "projects" and raise questions about the reproduction of social class through the intergenerational transmission of cultural capital.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-586
Number of pages25
JournalHarvard Educational Review
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

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