Dark traits and suicide: Associations between psychopathy, narcissism, and components of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide

Tiffany M. Harrop, Olivia C. Preston, Lauren R. Khazem, Michael D. Anestis, Regis Junearick, Bradley A. Green, Joye C. Anestis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies have identified independent relationships between psychopathy, narcissism, and suicidality. The current study expands upon the extant literature by exploring psychopathic and narcissistic personality traits and components of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide, utilizing a 3-factor model of psychopathy and 2-factor model of pathological narcissism in community, undergraduate, and military individuals. We hypothesized that the impulsive-antisocial facets of psychopathy would be related to suicidal desire, whereas all facets of psychopathy would relate to the capability for suicide. We anticipated an association between pathological narcissism, thwarted belongingness, and capability for suicide, but not perceived burdensomeness. We further hypothesized a relationship between physical pain tolerance and persistence and the affective (i.e., callousness) facet of psychopathy. Results partially supported these hypotheses and underscore the need for further examination of these associations utilizing contemporary models of psychopathy and narcissism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)928-938
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume126
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Keywords

  • Dark Triad
  • Narcissism
  • Psychopathy
  • Suicide

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