Deception detection theory as a basis for an automated investigation of the behavior analysis interview

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Although over 150,000 law enforcement personnel have been trained to use the Behavior Analysis Interview (BAI), the interview technique has been subjected to very little scrutiny in the laboratory setting. Building on theories of deception from communication and psychology literature, I propose to mine key lexical features from the verbal content of responses to the Behavior Analysis Interview. I expect to find that the responses from deceptive interviewees will differ from truthful responses across multiple lexical dimensions. In addition, I expect responses in high-stakes environments to differ from responses in low- or medium-stakes contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Pages103-110
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2009Aug 9 2009

Publication series

Name15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Volume1

Conference

Conference15th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2009, AMCIS 2009
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period8/6/098/9/09

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems
  • Library and Information Sciences

Keywords

  • Behavior analysis interview
  • Deception detection
  • Text mining

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