DEG/ENaC channels: A touchy superfamily that watches its salt

Itzhak Mano, Monica Driscoll

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To the surprise of many, studies of molecular mechanisms of touch transduction and analyses of epithelial Na+ transport have converged to define a new class of ion channel subunits. Based on the names of the first two identified subfamilies, the Caenorhabditis elegans degenerins and the vertebrate epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel, this ion channel class is called the DEG/ENaC superfamily. Members of the DEG/ENaC superfamily have been found in nematodes, flies, snails, and vertebrates. Family members share common topology, such that they span the membrane twice and have intracellular N- and C-termini; a large extracellular loop includes a conserved cysteine-rich region. DEG/ENaC channels have been implicated a broad spectrum of cellular functions, including mechanosensation, proprioception, pain sensation, gametogenesis, and epithelial Na+ transport. These channels exhibit diverse gating properties, ranging from near constitutive opening to rapid inactivation. We discuss working understanding of DEG/ENaC functions, channel properties, structure/activity correlations and possible evolutionary relationship to other channel classes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-578
Number of pages11
JournalBioEssays
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1999

Fingerprint

Watches
ion channels
Ion Channels
Vertebrates
Degenerin Sodium Channels
Salts
vertebrates
proprioception
Gametogenesis
salts
Proprioception
Amiloride
Snails
touch (sensation)
Caenorhabditis elegans
Touch
gametogenesis
Diptera
topology
Names

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "To the surprise of many, studies of molecular mechanisms of touch transduction and analyses of epithelial Na+ transport have converged to define a new class of ion channel subunits. Based on the names of the first two identified subfamilies, the Caenorhabditis elegans degenerins and the vertebrate epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel, this ion channel class is called the DEG/ENaC superfamily. Members of the DEG/ENaC superfamily have been found in nematodes, flies, snails, and vertebrates. Family members share common topology, such that they span the membrane twice and have intracellular N- and C-termini; a large extracellular loop includes a conserved cysteine-rich region. DEG/ENaC channels have been implicated a broad spectrum of cellular functions, including mechanosensation, proprioception, pain sensation, gametogenesis, and epithelial Na+ transport. These channels exhibit diverse gating properties, ranging from near constitutive opening to rapid inactivation. We discuss working understanding of DEG/ENaC functions, channel properties, structure/activity correlations and possible evolutionary relationship to other channel classes.",
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DEG/ENaC channels : A touchy superfamily that watches its salt. / Mano, Itzhak; Driscoll, Monica.

In: BioEssays, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.07.1999, p. 568-578.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - DEG/ENaC channels

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AU - Mano, Itzhak

AU - Driscoll, Monica

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