Design and Initial Evaluation of a Novel Oral Hygiene Technology for a Special Needs Population: A New Way to Clean

Maxine Strickland, Steven Mills, Bhargavi Dasari, Kenneth Markowitz, Carla Cugini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

9.4 million People have swallowing problems in the US. In special needs populations, routine oral hygiene procedures such as tooth brushing can result in aspiration of microbial laden fluids leading to a significant systemic challenge. Aspiration may lead to pneumonia in susceptible populations. These circumstances indicate the need for innovative approaches to oral hygiene for special needs, convalescent, the elderly populations, and young children learning to brush who can ingest excess fluoride which causes mottled enamel. Methods include describing some of the design considerations of the new prototype fabrication and microbiological evaluation of this new device, as well a comparison study of the versions 2 and 3 of the oral care device. Results concluded that version 3.0 regarding patient ease of use was better in comparison to version 2, which was the major difference, and 90% in both groups said they would recommend the new toothbrush. In the microbiological evaluation no growth was seen on any plates containing samples from either the experimental or the control after 48 h of incubation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number224
JournalDentistry Journal
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2023
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Dentistry

Keywords

  • microbiological methods
  • oral hygiene
  • powered toothbrush

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