Detection of co-occuring mental illness among adult patients in the New Jersey substance abuse treatment system

Hsou Mei Hu, Anna Kline, Frederick Y. Huang, Douglas M. Ziedonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We assessed the detection of mental illness in an adult population of substance abuse patients and the rate of referral for mental health treatment. Methods. We obtained combined administrative records from 1994 to 1997 provided by the New Jersey substance abuse and mental health systems and estimated detection and referral rates of patients with co-occurring disorders (n = 47 379). Mental illness was considered detected if a diagnosis was in the record and considered undetected if a diagnosis was not in the record but the patient was seen in both treatment systems within the same 12-month period. Predictors of detection and referral were identified. Results. The detection rate of co-occurring mental illness was 21.9% (n = 10 364); 57.9% (n = 6001) of these individuals were referred for mental health treatment. Methadone maintenance clinics had the lowest detection rate but the highest referral rate. Male, Hispanic, and African American patients, as well as those who used heroin or were in the criminal justice system, had a higher risk of mental illness not being detected. Once detected, African American patients, heroin users, and patients in the criminal justice system were less likely to be referred for treatment. Conclusions. There is a need to improve the detection of mental illness among substance abuse patients and to provide integrated treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1785-1793
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume96
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

Fingerprint

Substance-Related Disorders
Referral and Consultation
Mental Health
Criminal Law
Heroin
African Americans
Therapeutics
Methadone
Hispanic Americans
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hu, Hsou Mei ; Kline, Anna ; Huang, Frederick Y. ; Ziedonis, Douglas M. / Detection of co-occuring mental illness among adult patients in the New Jersey substance abuse treatment system. In: American journal of public health. 2006 ; Vol. 96, No. 10. pp. 1785-1793.
@article{085f78a6a51e4d2496caa979f4a21008,
title = "Detection of co-occuring mental illness among adult patients in the New Jersey substance abuse treatment system",
abstract = "Objectives. We assessed the detection of mental illness in an adult population of substance abuse patients and the rate of referral for mental health treatment. Methods. We obtained combined administrative records from 1994 to 1997 provided by the New Jersey substance abuse and mental health systems and estimated detection and referral rates of patients with co-occurring disorders (n = 47 379). Mental illness was considered detected if a diagnosis was in the record and considered undetected if a diagnosis was not in the record but the patient was seen in both treatment systems within the same 12-month period. Predictors of detection and referral were identified. Results. The detection rate of co-occurring mental illness was 21.9{\%} (n = 10 364); 57.9{\%} (n = 6001) of these individuals were referred for mental health treatment. Methadone maintenance clinics had the lowest detection rate but the highest referral rate. Male, Hispanic, and African American patients, as well as those who used heroin or were in the criminal justice system, had a higher risk of mental illness not being detected. Once detected, African American patients, heroin users, and patients in the criminal justice system were less likely to be referred for treatment. Conclusions. There is a need to improve the detection of mental illness among substance abuse patients and to provide integrated treatment.",
author = "Hu, {Hsou Mei} and Anna Kline and Huang, {Frederick Y.} and Ziedonis, {Douglas M.}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2005.072736",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "1785--1793",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "10",

}

Detection of co-occuring mental illness among adult patients in the New Jersey substance abuse treatment system. / Hu, Hsou Mei; Kline, Anna; Huang, Frederick Y.; Ziedonis, Douglas M.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 96, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 1785-1793.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Detection of co-occuring mental illness among adult patients in the New Jersey substance abuse treatment system

AU - Hu, Hsou Mei

AU - Kline, Anna

AU - Huang, Frederick Y.

AU - Ziedonis, Douglas M.

PY - 2006/10/1

Y1 - 2006/10/1

N2 - Objectives. We assessed the detection of mental illness in an adult population of substance abuse patients and the rate of referral for mental health treatment. Methods. We obtained combined administrative records from 1994 to 1997 provided by the New Jersey substance abuse and mental health systems and estimated detection and referral rates of patients with co-occurring disorders (n = 47 379). Mental illness was considered detected if a diagnosis was in the record and considered undetected if a diagnosis was not in the record but the patient was seen in both treatment systems within the same 12-month period. Predictors of detection and referral were identified. Results. The detection rate of co-occurring mental illness was 21.9% (n = 10 364); 57.9% (n = 6001) of these individuals were referred for mental health treatment. Methadone maintenance clinics had the lowest detection rate but the highest referral rate. Male, Hispanic, and African American patients, as well as those who used heroin or were in the criminal justice system, had a higher risk of mental illness not being detected. Once detected, African American patients, heroin users, and patients in the criminal justice system were less likely to be referred for treatment. Conclusions. There is a need to improve the detection of mental illness among substance abuse patients and to provide integrated treatment.

AB - Objectives. We assessed the detection of mental illness in an adult population of substance abuse patients and the rate of referral for mental health treatment. Methods. We obtained combined administrative records from 1994 to 1997 provided by the New Jersey substance abuse and mental health systems and estimated detection and referral rates of patients with co-occurring disorders (n = 47 379). Mental illness was considered detected if a diagnosis was in the record and considered undetected if a diagnosis was not in the record but the patient was seen in both treatment systems within the same 12-month period. Predictors of detection and referral were identified. Results. The detection rate of co-occurring mental illness was 21.9% (n = 10 364); 57.9% (n = 6001) of these individuals were referred for mental health treatment. Methadone maintenance clinics had the lowest detection rate but the highest referral rate. Male, Hispanic, and African American patients, as well as those who used heroin or were in the criminal justice system, had a higher risk of mental illness not being detected. Once detected, African American patients, heroin users, and patients in the criminal justice system were less likely to be referred for treatment. Conclusions. There is a need to improve the detection of mental illness among substance abuse patients and to provide integrated treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749328797&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33749328797&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.2005.072736

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.2005.072736

M3 - Article

C2 - 17008574

AN - SCOPUS:33749328797

VL - 96

SP - 1785

EP - 1793

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 10

ER -