Dietary phenolics as reactive carbonyl scavengers: Potential impact on human health and mechanism of action

Chi Tang Ho, Mingfu Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of reactive carbonyl compounds in human tissue will accelerate the vascular damage in both diabetes and uremia. Moreover, advanced glycation progressively and irreversibly modify the proteins over time and yield advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are thought to contribute to the development of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Therefore, we propose a novel approach to decrease the levels of dicarbonyl compounds by direct trapping of dietary polyphenolic compounds, and consequently, inhibit the formation of AGEs and prevent the development of diabetic complications and age-related diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-141
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Keywords

  • Advanced glycation end products
  • Diabetes
  • Dietary phenolic compounds
  • Epigallocatechin-3-gallate
  • Reactive carbonyl species

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