Differences in ovarian hormones in relation to parity and time since last birth

Emily Barrett, Lauren E. Parlett, Gayle C. Windham, Shanna H. Swan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To examine ovarian function in relation to parity and time since last birth. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Health-care program in California. Patient(s) 346 naturally cycling women, aged 18 to 39 years. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Mean follicular urinary estradiol metabolite concentration (E1C) (cycle days -8 to -1), mean luteal progesterone metabolite concentration (PdG) (days 0 to +10), and cycle phase lengths in ovulatory cycles. Result(s) After the women had collected daily urine samples for up to eight menstrual cycles, we measured the E1C and PdG using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The cycle phase lengths were calculated from the hormone profiles and daily diaries. Women who had given birth within the previous 3 years had lower E1C than the nulliparous women and women who last given birth >3 years earlier. Among the parous women, E1C was positively associated with the time since last birth. Women who last gave birth >3 years earlier had longer follicular phases than the nulliparous women. There were no associations between parity and PdG or luteal phase length. Conclusion(s) Our cross-sectional data suggest that ovarian function differs in nulliparous and parous women and is positively associated with the time since last birth. Longitudinal research is needed to explore within-woman changes in ovarian function prepartum and postpartum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1773-1780.e1
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume101
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Keywords

  • Estradiol
  • fecundity
  • menstrual cycle
  • motherhood
  • ovarian function

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