Differential neural activation in healthy older adults compared to subjects with Parkinson's disease during motor imagery of walking in virtual environments

I. Maidan, K. Rosenberg-Katz, Y. Jacob, N. Giladi, J. E. Deutsch, J. M. Hausdorff, A. Mirelman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The neural correlates of locomotion in complex environments are unclear. Twenty healthy older adults and 20 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) were asked to imagine walking in different virtual environments in MRI scanner. Whole brain analyses were performed. Between group comparisons revealed that patients with PD had a significantly higher activation already during imagined usual walk. However, comparisons between walking tasks showed increased activation during imagined complex walking tasks only in healthy older adults. This increased activation in patients with PD act as a compensatory strategy that limits the ability to recruit additional brain areas during more demanding walking tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages5-10
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781479989843
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 16 2015
Event11th Annual International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2015 - Valencia, Spain
Duration: Jun 9 2015Jun 12 2015

Publication series

NameInternational Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR
ISSN (Electronic)2331-9569

Other

Other11th Annual International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation, ICVR 2015
CountrySpain
CityValencia
Period6/9/156/12/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Keywords

  • Gait
  • Motor imagery
  • Parkinson's disease
  • fMRI
  • virtual environment

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