Differential resistance among crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia) species, hybrids, and cultivars to foliar feeding by adult flea beetles (Altica litigata)

Raul I. Cabrera, James A. Reinert, Cynthia B. McKenney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Field (choice) and laboratory (no choice) studies were conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of 12 crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia) cultivars, representing two species and their interspecific hybrids, to feeding damage by the flea beetle (Altica litigata Fall). The results indicate that as a group, the L. indica L. cultivars were more susceptible to attack and significant herbivory damage by Altica beetles, whereas all the L. fauriei Koehne cultivars and most of the interspecific L. indica x fauriei hybrids were resistant. Significant differences in feeding damage were observed between the new and older leaves in the susceptible hybrid 'Biloxi' and L. indica 'Whit IV', but not in the rest of the cultivars. Mineral nutrient content differences were observed between species with L. indica cultivars having a significantly contrasting nutrient status profile compared with the L. fauriei and interspecific hybrid cultivar groups. The results indicate that the factors influencing Altica flea beetle-feeding preferences and damage are inherited and therefore will allow the implementation of pest management practices that minimize damage and optimize chemical control strategies. In addition, opportunities may exist for breeding and selection efforts that could lead to superior cultivars with insect resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-407
Number of pages5
JournalHortScience
Volume43
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture

Keywords

  • Altica litigata
  • Crape myrtle
  • Cultivars
  • Flea beetle
  • Host resistance
  • Lagerstroemia

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