Disclosing Mental Illness Information to a Friend: Exploring How the Disclosure Decision-Making Model Informs Strategy Selection

Maria K. Venetis, Skye Chernichky-Karcher, Patricia E. Gettings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Within the context of mental illness disclosure between friends, this study tested the disclosure decision-making model (DD-MM; Greene, 2009) to comprehensively investigate factors that predict disclosure enactment strategies. The DD-MM describes how individuals determine whether they will reveal or conceal non-visible health information. Processes of revealing, called disclosures, take various forms including preparation and rehearsal, directness, third-party disclosure, incremental disclosures, entrapment, and indirect mediums (Afifi & Steuber, 2009). We explore the disclosure decision-making process to understand how college students select to disclose their mental illness information with a friend. Participants were 144 students at a Midwestern university who had disclosed their mental illness information to a friend. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that college students choose strategies based on their evaluation of information assessment and closeness, and that for some strategies, efficacy mediates the relationship between information assessment and strategy. This manuscript discusses implications of findings and suggests direction for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-663
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Communication
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2018
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Disclosing Mental Illness Information to a Friend: Exploring How the Disclosure Decision-Making Model Informs Strategy Selection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this