Disordered eating, socio-cultural media influencers, body image, and psychological factors among a racially/ethnically diverse population of college women

Virginia M. Quick, Carol Byrd-Bredbenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined disordered eating, socio-cultural media influencers, body image, and psychological factors among a large, racially/ethnically diverse sample of college women (n = 1445; 58% White, 21% Asian, 11% Hispanic, 11% Black) who completed an online survey. Black women were significantly more satisfied with their weight and shape and had lower eating concerns, disinhibited eating, and emotional eating than all other racial/ethnic groups. Black women tended to have significantly higher levels of self-esteem, were less likely to compare their body to those of people in the media, felt less pressured to attain the physical appearance standard set by the media, and had less awareness of the societal appearance norms set by the media than other racial groups. Findings suggest that Black college women, independent of weight status, may be protected from disordered eating, negative body image, and societal media pressures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-41
Number of pages5
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • Body image
  • College
  • Disordered eating
  • Women

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