Do consumers' attitudes and preferences determine their FAFH behavior? An application of the theory of planned behavior

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16 Scopus citations

Abstract

American consumers spend almost half of their food dollars on food away from home (FAFH) despite potential harmful effects of eating out more frequently. This study examines how consumers' attitudes toward FAFH and their personal preferences influence their behavior of eating food away from home. This study differs from previous work by using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to model consumers' FAFH behavior. Empirical testing of consumers' FAFH behavior reveals several interesting and important findings. Results show that negative attitudes toward FAFH reduced consumers' frequency of eating out, whereas the availability of healthy food, good service, and convenience in restaurants increased consumers' frequency of eating out. The policy implications of such study findings are discussed. [EconLit citations: D120].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-220
Number of pages16
JournalAgribusiness
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

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