E-government versus e-business: A comparison of online recruitment in the public and private sectors

Patrice M. Mareschal, Joel P. Rudin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, the authors assessed the usability of e-recruitment websites in the 50 states and the 50 largest American businesses. It is found that states were much less likely than businesses to accept online job applications. For example, it is impossible to apply online for a state government position in the three largest states. When it was possible to apply online for a state government job, the websites tended to be less user-friendly and informative than their private-sector counterparts. The major exception to this pattern was that the state government websites tended to be less secretive about pay rates. Because of the digital divide, state governments cannot rely exclusively on online applications. However, state governments should be able to offer a more advanced online job application process. The authors conclude by discussing implications for e-democracy, offering suggestions for research and practice, and identifying the two states with the least advanced recruitment practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-467
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Review of Public Administration
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Keywords

  • digital divide
  • e-democracy
  • e-government
  • recruitment
  • state government

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