Educating for a knowledge management future: Perceptions of library and information professionals

Gray Southon, Ross Todd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The emerging diffuse and complex discourse on knowledge management has, amongst many things, given some focus to the nature of education and training for professionals engaged in managing knowledge. The complexity of charting an educational and training pathway becomes apparent when considered against the plethora of perspectives of what constitutes knowledge management, as well as the various underpinning assumptions about its nature, contextualisation, role, and indeed, the meanings of its constituent terms 'knowledge' and 'management'. This paper is the second part of the findings of a research project undertaken in 1999 and 2000 to identify the perspectives of experienced professionals working in the library and information sector in relation to knowledge management, and in particular to identify directions for the education and training of library and information professionals who wish to be engaged in managing knowledge. Part 1 identified considerable variation in levels of awareness of the term 'knowledge management', in the perceptions of knowledge management, and its relation to information management, and in the perception of the institutional understanding of and responses to knowledge management (Southon & Todd, 2001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-326
Number of pages14
JournalAustralian Library Journal
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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knowledge management
information management
education
research project
discourse
management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

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Educating for a knowledge management future : Perceptions of library and information professionals. / Southon, Gray; Todd, Ross.

In: Australian Library Journal, Vol. 50, No. 4, 01.01.2001, p. 313-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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