Effect of frequent assessment of suicidal thinking on its incidence and severity: high-resolution real-time monitoring study

Daniel D.L. Coppersmith, Rebecca G. Fortgang, Evan M. Kleiman, Alexander J. Millner, April L. Yeager, Patrick Mair, Matthew K. Nock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Researchers, clinicians and patients are increasingly using real-time monitoring methods to understand and predict suicidal thoughts and behaviours. These methods involve frequently assessing suicidal thoughts, but it is not known whether asking about suicide repeatedly is iatrogenic. We tested two questions about this approach: (a) does repeatedly assessing suicidal thinking over short periods of time increase suicidal thinking, and (b) is more frequent assessment of suicidal thinking associated with more severe suicidal thinking? In a real-time monitoring study (n = 101 participants, n = 12 793 surveys), we found no evidence to support the notion that repeated assessment of suicidal thoughts is iatrogenic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-43
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume220
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • Suicide
  • ecological momentary assessment
  • self-harm
  • statistical methodology
  • suicidal ideation

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