Effect of succimer on growth of preschool children with moderate blood lead levels

Karen E. Peterson, Mikhail Salganik, Carla Campbell, George Rhoads, Judith Rubin, Omer Beger, James H. Ware, Walter Rogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Growth deficits associated with lead exposure might be ameliorated by chelation. We examined the effect of succimer on growth in 780 children 12-33 months old who had blood lead levels of 20-44 μg/dL and were randomized to receive up to three 26-day courses of succimer or placebo in a multicenter, double-blind trial. The difference in changes in weight and height between succimer and placebo groups at 1-34 months was calculated by fitting cubic splines. The difference in height change in children on succimer compared with placebo was -0.27 cm [95% confidence interval (95% CI), -0.42 to -0.11] from baseline to 9 months, when 99% of children had completed treatment, and -0.43 cm, (95% CI, -0.77 to -0.09) during 34 months of follow-up. Similar differences in weight gain were not statistically significant. Although succimer lowers blood lead in moderately lead-poisoned children, it does not have a beneficial effect on growth and may have an adverse effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalEnvironmental health perspectives
Volume112
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Keywords

  • Blood lead levels
  • Chelation
  • Children
  • Clinical trial
  • Growth
  • Succimer

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    Peterson, K. E., Salganik, M., Campbell, C., Rhoads, G., Rubin, J., Beger, O., Ware, J. H., & Rogan, W. (2004). Effect of succimer on growth of preschool children with moderate blood lead levels. Environmental health perspectives, 112(2), 233-237.