Effects of aging on gene expression in blood of captive Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) and comparisons with expression in humans

Chao Chao Yan, Xin Shang Zhang, Liang Zhou, Qiao Yang, Min Zhou, Lin Wan Zhang, Jin Chuan Xing, Zhi Feng Yan, Megan Price, Jing Li, Bi Song Yue, Zhen Xin Fan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Changes in gene expression occur as animals, including primates, age. Macaques have long been used as a model species for primate evolution and biomedical studies. Here, to study gene expression in Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana, TMs) and its differences to humans, we applied RNA-Seq to obtain the blood transcriptomes of 24 TMs. In total, 2 523 age-associated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Several pathways and processes that regulate aging, including the FoxO signaling pathway, autophagy, and platelet activation, were significantly enriched in the up-regulated DEGs. Two significantly age-related modules were identified by weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). The TMs and humans shared 279 common DEGs, including 111 up-regulated and 141 down-regulated genes with advancing age in the same expression direction. However, 27 age-related DEGs presented the opposite expression direction in TMs as that in humans. For example, INPPL1, with inhibitory effects on the B cell receptor signaling pathway, was up-regulated in humans but down-regulated in TMs. In general, our study suggests that aging is a critical factor affecting gene expression in the captive TM population. The similarities and differences in gene expression patterns between TMs and humans could provide new insights into primate evolution and benefit TM model development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)557-563
Number of pages7
JournalZoological research
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of aging on gene expression in blood of captive Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) and comparisons with expression in humans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this