Elderly Volunteering in Europe: The Relationship Between Volunteering and Quality of Life Depends on Volunteering Rates

Leszek Morawski, Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn, Marianna Strzelecka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of volunteering on quality of life (QoL) in 50+ populations across European countries and Israel. We analyzed data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Using the Kendall tau-b correlation coefficients, we show that the extent of effect volunteering has on quality of life is nonlinearly related to the prevalence of volunteering in a given country. The relationship follows an inverted-U-shaped curve. In countries where volunteering is the most popular (Denmark, Switzerland, and Belgium) and in countries with the lowest rates (Poland, Greece, the Czech Republic, and Spain), the correlation between volunteering and one’s quality of life is low. The correlation is high in countries with medium levels of volunteering (Austria, Italy, and Israel). Moreover, volunteering affects more internal than external domains of QoL. These new insights extend the discussion started by Haski-Leventhal (Voluntas Int J Volunt Nonprofit Organ 20:388–404, 2009). Our study is correlational, and we do not claim causality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-268
Number of pages13
JournalVoluntas
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Strategy and Management

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Elderly
  • Happiness
  • Life satisfaction
  • Social capital
  • Social transfers
  • Subjective well-being (SWB)
  • Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)
  • Volunteering

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