Employee perspectives on implementation communication as predictors of perceptions of success and resistance

Laurie K. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines employee experiences in communicating with implementers of planned change and the effects of those experiences on employees' perceptions of success and of resistance to planned changes. Results indicate that the higher the perceived value of their own input and of leaders' communication of vision, the higher their perceptions of success were, whereas higher degrees of involvement of lower level staff and perceived resistance militated against success. Further, the higher the evaluation of quality of implementation information, the less likely the employees were to perceive resistance to the change. Also, the more forced the nature of the implementation, the more likely the employees were to perceive resistance to the change. Mere frequency of communication (both in receiving information and providing input) was unrelated to employees' perceptions of success. Implications for implementers and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-46
Number of pages24
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Keywords

  • Change Resistance
  • Communication
  • Employee Perspectives
  • Implementation
  • Implementation Information
  • Input Seeking
  • Leader Vision
  • Technology

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