End-state land uses, sustainably protective systems, and risk management: A challenge for remediation and multigenerational stewardship

Michael Greenberg, Joanna Burger, Michael Gochfeld, David Kosson, Karen Lowrie, Henry Mayer, Charles W. Powers, Conrad D. Volz, Vikram Vyas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article discusses creating a sustainably protective engineered and human management system in perpetuity for sites with long-lived radiological and chemical hazards. This is essential at this time because the federal government is evaluating its property as assets and attempting to reduce its holdings, while seeking to assure that health and ecosystems are not put at risk. To assist those who have a stake in the remediation, management, and stewardship of these and analogous privately owned sites, this article discusses current end-state planning by reviewing the federal government's accelerated efforts to reduce its footprint and how those efforts relate to sustainability. The article also provides a list of questions organized around six elements of risk management and primary, secondary, and tertiary disease and injury prevention. Throughout the article, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is used as an example of an organization that seeks to reduce its footprint, manage its budget, and be a steward of the sites that it is responsible for. However, the approach and questions are appropriate for land controlled by the Department of Defense (DOD), the General Services Administration (GSA), and other public and private owners of sites with residual contamination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-105
Number of pages15
JournalRemediation
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

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