Epidemiology of human T-lymphotropic virus type III and the risk of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

W. A. Blattner, R. J. Biggar, S. H. Weiss, M. Melbye, J. J. Goedert

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

The discovery of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV) has opened a window to the understanding of the spectrum of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and related clinical syndromes. Analysis of risk factors for seropositivity has shown that HTLV-III is transmitted most efficiently via routes that involve close personal contact or parenteral exposure. Longitudinal studies have shown that HTLV-III infection has a long latent period. The prevalence of AIDS in different geographic areas and among different risk groups appears to depend in part on duration of exposure. Co-factors for AIDS outcome such as manner and route of exposure, underlying immune status, and host susceptibility are also likely to play a role in risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-670
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of internal medicine
Volume103
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

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