Epistemic Trust and Education: Effects of Informant Reliability on Student Learning of Decimal Concepts

Kelley Durkin, Patrick Shafto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The epistemic trust literature emphasizes that children's evaluations of informants' trustworthiness affects learning, but there is no evidence that epistemic trust affects learning in academic domains. The current study investigated how reliability affects decimal learning. Fourth and fifth graders (N = 122; Mage = 10.1 years) compared examples from consistently accurate and inaccurate informants (consistent) or informants who were each sometimes accurate and inaccurate (inconsistent). Fourth graders had higher conceptual knowledge and fewer misconceptions in the consistent condition than the inconsistent condition, and vice versa for fifth graders due to differences in prior exposure to decimals. Given the same examples, learning differed depending on informant reliability. Thus, epistemic trust is a malleable factor that affects learning in an academic domain. Child Development

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-164
Number of pages11
JournalChild development
Volume87
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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