Evaluation of the effectiveness of a community-based enriched model prenatal intervention project in the District of Columbia

Allen A. Herman, Heinz W. Berendes, Kai F. Yu, Leslie C. Cooper, Mary D. Overpeck, George Rhoads, Joan P. Maxwell, Barbara A. Kinney, Patricia A. Koslowe, Deborah L. Coates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate an enriched prenatal intervention program designed to reduce the risk of low birth weight. Study Setting. Freestanding community based prenatal intervention project located in a poor inner-city community, serving mostly African American women. Study Design. All women less than 29 weeks pregnant were eligible to participate. They were compared to women who lived in neighborhoods with similar rates of poverty. Data Collection. The birth certificate was the source of data on maternal age, education, marital status, timing and frequency of prenatal care attendance, parity, gravidity, prior pregnancy terminations, fetal and child deaths, and birth weight. Principal Findings. Thirty-eight percent of the women who delivered live born infants in the study area participated in the program. There were no differences in low and very low birthweight rates in the study and comparison groups. In a secondary analysis comparing participants and nonparticipants in the study census tracts, participants were at higher risk for low and very low birth weight, and they adhered more closely to the schedule of prenatal visits than nonparticipants. Low- and very low birthweight rates were lower among participants than among nonparticipants and comparison women. Conclusion. The Better Babies Project did not have an effect on the overall low- and very low birthweight rates in the study census tracts. This was probably due to the low participation rates and the high population mobility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-621
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume31
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 23 1996

Fingerprint

Censuses
Gravidity
Birth Certificates
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Fetal Death
Prenatal Care
Information Storage and Retrieval
Maternal Age
Marital Status
Low Birth Weight Infant
Poverty
Parity
Birth Weight
African Americans
Appointments and Schedules
Education
Pregnancy
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Keywords

  • Prenatal care
  • evaluation
  • low birth weight
  • very low birth weight

Cite this

Herman, A. A., Berendes, H. W., Yu, K. F., Cooper, L. C., Overpeck, M. D., Rhoads, G., ... Coates, D. L. (1996). Evaluation of the effectiveness of a community-based enriched model prenatal intervention project in the District of Columbia. Health Services Research, 31(5), 609-621.
Herman, Allen A. ; Berendes, Heinz W. ; Yu, Kai F. ; Cooper, Leslie C. ; Overpeck, Mary D. ; Rhoads, George ; Maxwell, Joan P. ; Kinney, Barbara A. ; Koslowe, Patricia A. ; Coates, Deborah L. / Evaluation of the effectiveness of a community-based enriched model prenatal intervention project in the District of Columbia. In: Health Services Research. 1996 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 609-621.
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Herman, AA, Berendes, HW, Yu, KF, Cooper, LC, Overpeck, MD, Rhoads, G, Maxwell, JP, Kinney, BA, Koslowe, PA & Coates, DL 1996, 'Evaluation of the effectiveness of a community-based enriched model prenatal intervention project in the District of Columbia', Health Services Research, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 609-621.

Evaluation of the effectiveness of a community-based enriched model prenatal intervention project in the District of Columbia. / Herman, Allen A.; Berendes, Heinz W.; Yu, Kai F.; Cooper, Leslie C.; Overpeck, Mary D.; Rhoads, George; Maxwell, Joan P.; Kinney, Barbara A.; Koslowe, Patricia A.; Coates, Deborah L.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 31, No. 5, 23.12.1996, p. 609-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yu, Kai F.

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AU - Rhoads, George

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Herman AA, Berendes HW, Yu KF, Cooper LC, Overpeck MD, Rhoads G et al. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a community-based enriched model prenatal intervention project in the District of Columbia. Health Services Research. 1996 Dec 23;31(5):609-621.