Factors affecting tissue distribution of heavy metals - Age effects and the metal concentration patterns in common terns, Sterna hirundo

Michael Gochfeld, Joanna Burger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Metal distribution in an organism at any one time is a resultant of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Improved analytic methodology has made it feasible to obtain highly sensitive determinations for many metals in a single sample. Thus, it is now feasible to examine patterns of metal distribution. We report on a study of the effect of age on metal patterns in the common tern, Sterna hirundo, a fisheating seabird. We contrast the levels of nine metals in the liver of adult and young terns and compared these with levels in tern eggs. Unlike many previous studies, adults did not have significantly higher levels of metals, although for most metals, levels in eggs were significantly lower than liver levels of young and adults. The intermetal correlations showed more significant positive correlations for adults and eggs than for chicks, the latter showing instead a correlational chaos, probably reflecting the immaturity of their physiologic defense mechanisms and the absence of dynamic equilibrium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-399
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Trace Element Research
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1987

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Keywords

  • Metals, factors affecting tissue distribution of
  • Sterna hirundo
  • aluminum
  • cadmium
  • chromium
  • cobalt
  • common tern
  • copper
  • lead
  • manganese
  • mercury
  • metal concentration
  • metal excretion
  • metallothionein
  • nickel
  • zinc

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