FEAR OF CRIME IN URBAN RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS: Implications of Between‐ and Within‐Neighborhood Sources for Current Models

Jeanette Covington, Ralph B. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

347 Scopus citations

Abstract

Current work on fear of crime centers largely around three dominant theoretical models: indirect victimization, community concern, and incivilities. Previous work (Taylor and Hale 1986) confirms the importance of the central construct in each model and shows that no one model has more explanatory power than another. But work to date has not examined ecological impacts of some key constructs, even though the models clearly imply processes operative at the neighborhood level. This study extends earlier work, combining central predictors from each model and distinguishing between‐ and within‐neighborhood sources of impact, with data from surveys of 1622 residents of 66 Baltimore neighborhoods and from on‐site assessments. Findings indicate ways in which these theories, particularly indirect victimization and incivilities, need further theoretical articulation of central constructs. The results also confirm the generalizability of Merry's diversity thesis—developed from field work in a multi‐ethnic subsidized housing context—to urban neighborhoods in a major metropolitan area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-249
Number of pages19
JournalSociological Quarterly
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1991

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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