Fenugreek supplementation during high-fat feeding improves specific markers of metabolic health

Eric J. Knott, Allison J. Richard, Randall L. Mynatt, David Ribnicky, Jacqueline M. Stephens, Annadora Bruce-Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To assess the metabolically beneficial effects of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), C57BL/6J mice were fed a low- or high-fat diet for 16 weeks with or without 2% (w/w) fenugreek supplementation. Body weight, body composition, energy expenditure, food intake, and insulin/glucose tolerance were measured regularly, and tissues were collected for histological and biochemical analysis after 16 weeks of diet exposure. Fenugreek did not alter body weight, fat mass, or food intake in either group, but did transiently improve glucose tolerance in high fat-fed mice. Fenugreek also significantly improved high-density lipoprotein to low-density lipoprotein ratios in high fat-fed mice without affecting circulating total cholesterol, triglycerides, or glycerol levels. Fenugreek decreased hepatic expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 and increased subcutaneous inguinal adipose tissue expression of adiponectin, but did not prevent hepatic steatosis. Notably, fenugreek was not as effective at improving glucose tolerance as was four days of voluntary wheel running. Overall, our results demonstrate that fenugreek promotes metabolic resiliency via significant and selected effects on glucose regulation, hyperlipidemia, and adipose pathology; but may not be as effective as behavioral modifications at preventing the adverse metabolic consequences of a high fat diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number12770
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Trigonella
Fats
Health
Glucose
High Fat Diet
Eating
Body Weight
Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins
Groin
Subcutaneous Fat
Liver
Adiponectin
HDL Lipoproteins
Body Composition
Hyperlipidemias
Inbred C57BL Mouse
LDL Lipoproteins
Running
Glycerol
Energy Metabolism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Knott, Eric J. ; Richard, Allison J. ; Mynatt, Randall L. ; Ribnicky, David ; Stephens, Jacqueline M. ; Bruce-Keller, Annadora. / Fenugreek supplementation during high-fat feeding improves specific markers of metabolic health. In: Scientific reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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Fenugreek supplementation during high-fat feeding improves specific markers of metabolic health. / Knott, Eric J.; Richard, Allison J.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Ribnicky, David; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 12770, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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