Flow cytometric characterization of antigen-specific T cells based on RNA and its advantages in detecting infections and immunological disorders

Felix Radford, Sanjay Tyagi, Maria Laura Gennaro, Richard Pine, Yuri Bushkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with flow cytometry (FISH-Flow) is a highly quantitative, high-throughput platform allowing precise quantification of total mRNA transcripts in single cells. In undiagnosed infections posing a significant health burden worldwide, such as latent tuberculosis or asymptomatic recurrent malaria, an important challenge is to develop accurate diagnostic tools. Antigen-specific T cells create a persistent memory to pathogens, making them useful for diagnosis of infection. Stimulation of memory response initiates T-cell transitions between functional states. Numerous studies have shown that changes in protein levels lag real-time T-cell transitions. However, analysis at the single-cell transcriptional level can determine the differences. FISH-Flow is a powerful tool with which to study the functional states of T-cell subsets and to identify the gene expression profiles of antigen-specific T cells during disease progression. Advances in instrumentation, fluorophores, and FISH methodologies will broaden and deepen the use of FISH-Flow, changing the immunological field by allowing determination of functional immune signatures at the mRNA level and the development of new diagnostic tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-378
Number of pages20
JournalCritical Reviews in Immunology
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Keywords

  • FISH-flow
  • Immune signatures
  • Infectious diseases
  • Single-cell gene expression

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