Formation of viscoelastic protein layers on polymeric surfaces relevant to platelet adhesion

Norbert Weber, Hans Peter Wendel, Joachim Kohn

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58 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hemocompatibility of biomaterials is highly dependent on the adhesion and activation of platelets. Surface-adsorbed fibrinogen has a dominant role in promoting platelet adhesion to artificial surfaces by binding glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa), the major platelet membrane receptor. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), we have investigated the material-dependent binding kinetics of purified GPIIb-IIIa to polymer-adsorbed fibrinogen. The following ranking of polymer-adsorbed mass (fibrinogen and GPIIb-IIIa) to test polymers could be established: poly[desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl (DTE) carbonate]/poly(lactide-co-glycolide) > poly[DTE co-5% poly(ethylene glycol) carbonate]. The QCM-D fibrinogen adsorption data were confirmed using an immunofluorescence assay. A synthetic RGD-containing peptide, but not a control peptide, inhibited GPIIb-IIIa binding to polymer-adsorbed fibrinogen, demonstrating the specificity of binding. Importantly, the binding efficiency of purified GPIIb-IIIa to polymer-adsorbed fibrinogen correlated with increased platelet adhesion in an in vitro model. Theoretical simulations using a Voight-based model provided quantitative data on the thickness and viscoelastic properties of the polymer-adsorbed protein layers. The precision of the modeling technique was limited with respect to the shear moduli values, leading to large variations. However, the other modeling parameters showed reproducible results. The thickness of both protein layers was polymer-dependent and ranged from 5 to 35 run and the viscosity from 0.001 to 0.005 kg/ms, whereas the protein layer densities showed little differences between the test polymers. These results suggest that material-dependent changes in the thickness and viscoelastic properties of adsorbed fibrinogen-GPIIb-IIIa layers are crucial factors in the binding behavior of platelets to biomaterials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-427
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume72
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

Keywords

  • Fibrinogen adsorption
  • Platelet receptor glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa)
  • Poly(ethylene glycol)
  • Polycarbonates
  • Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D)

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