Functional relationships between serum total cholesterol levels, executive control, and sustained attention

Mathew H. Gendle, Andrea M. Spaeth, Sarah M. Dollard, Cindy A. Novak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the potential relationship between serum total cholesterol (TC) and two specific aspects of cognition (executive control and sustained attention) in a non-elderly sample, after controlling for life stress and several sociodemographic and health variables. For each participant (n = 46), measurements of TC, physical health, and life stress were obtained, and executive control and sustained attention were assessed using the Tower of London and the Digit Vigilance Test. The outcomes of these cognitive assessments were correlated with TC, and a covariate-adjusted analysis was performed. After controlling for several co-variates, TC was found to be significantly negatively associated with components of executive control and sustained attention. Because these cognitive functions are crucial in the moment-to-moment regulation of behavior, elevated TC may have negative behavioral consequences in everyday life situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-94
Number of pages11
JournalNutritional Neuroscience
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2008
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Executive control
  • Stress
  • Sustained attention
  • Total cholesterol

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