Fungal secondary metabolism - From biochemistry to genomics

Nancy P. Keller, Geoffrey Turner, Joan W. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1026 Scopus citations

Abstract

Much of natural product chemistry concerns a group of compounds known as secondary metabolites. These low-molecular-weight metabolites often have potent physiological activities. Digitalis, morphine and quinine are plant secondary metabolites, whereas penicillin, cephalosporin, ergotrate and the statins are equally well known fungal secondary metabolites. Although chemically diverse, all secondary metabolites are produced by a few common biosynthetic pathways, often in conjunction with morphological development. Recent advances in molecular biology, bioinformatics and comparative genomics have revealed that the genes encoding specific fungal secondary metabolites are clustered and often located near telomeres. In this review, we address some important questions, including which evolutionary pressures led to gene clustering, why closely related species produce different profiles of secondary metabolites, and whether fungal genomics will accelerate the discovery of new pharmacologically active natural products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)937-947
Number of pages11
JournalNature Reviews Microbiology
Volume3
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Fungal secondary metabolism - From biochemistry to genomics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this