Gender differences in the factors that affect self-assessments of health

Jeffrey S. Gonzalez, Gretchen B. Chapman, Howard Leventhal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We hypothesized that women's self-assessments of health (SAH) would decrease more than men's when participants considered the functional limitations of illness and non-health-related sources of emotional distress. We examined the effects of type of illness, illness-produced limitations, and distress from illness- and nonillness-related sources on men's and women's SAH. Women's SAH were significantly more responsive than men's to the affective and functionally limiting aspects of illness. This suggests that women include a broader range of illness factors unrelated to mortality when evaluating their own health and explains why men's SAH have been found to be more strongly related to mortality. Contrary to our hypothesis, men's SAH were significantly more responsive than women's to social sources of distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-155
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Applied Biobehavioral Research
Volume7
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 19 2003

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self-assessment
gender-specific factors
illness
Health
health
Men's Health
mortality
Mortality
Self-Assessment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Gonzalez, J. S., Chapman, G. B., & Leventhal, H. (2003). Gender differences in the factors that affect self-assessments of health. Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 7(2), 133-155.
Gonzalez, Jeffrey S. ; Chapman, Gretchen B. ; Leventhal, Howard. / Gender differences in the factors that affect self-assessments of health. In: Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research. 2003 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 133-155.
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Gonzalez, JS, Chapman, GB & Leventhal, H 2003, 'Gender differences in the factors that affect self-assessments of health', Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 133-155.

Gender differences in the factors that affect self-assessments of health. / Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Chapman, Gretchen B.; Leventhal, Howard.

In: Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, Vol. 7, No. 2, 19.06.2003, p. 133-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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