Gender Inequality in the Home: The Role of Relative Income, Support for Traditional Gender Roles, and Perceived Entitlement

Janell C. Fetterolf, Laurie A. Rudman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drawing on relative resources and gender construction theories, we examined economic and psychological factors that affect married parents’ domestic labor. Married parents from the United States (N = 801) reported whether they earned less, equal, or more income than their spouses, as well as the proportion of housework and childcare they performed. In line with a relative resources perspective, participants reported doing less domestic labor as their relative income increased. Yet, in line with gender construction theories, women reported doing more domestic labor than their spouses, regardless of their relative income. Moreover, support for traditional gender roles mediated the effect of income on domestic labor for women, but not men. In contrast, perceived domestic entitlement (feeling justified doing less domestic labor than one’s spouse) mediated the effect of income on domestic labor for men, but not women. The implications for the future of gender equality are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-237
Number of pages19
JournalGender Issues
Volume31
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies

Keywords

  • Domestic equality
  • Gender construction
  • Gender equality
  • Relative resources
  • The second shift

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