Gratitude and grit indirectly reduce risk of suicidal ideations by enhancing meaning in life: Evidence for a mediated moderation model

Evan M. Kleiman, Leah M. Adams, Todd B. Kashdan, John H. Riskind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

152 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined meaning in life as a suicide resiliency factor. Since meaning in life may be hard to directly modify, we examine gratitude and grit as factors that synergistically confer resiliency to suicide by increasing meaning in life. Using a longitudinal study of 209 college students, we find that gratitude and grit interact such that individuals endorsing high gratitude and grit experience a near absence of suicidal ideations over time. Testing a mediated moderation model we find that grit and gratitude confer resiliency to suicide by increasing meaning in life. Our findings illustrating the importance of examining co-occurring personality factors as well as the mechanisms of these factors that can confer resiliency to suicide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-546
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Keywords

  • Gratitude
  • Grit
  • Meaning in life
  • Resilience
  • Suicide

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