Greater history of weight-related stigmatizing experience is associated with greater weight loss in obesity treatment

Janet D. Latner, G. Terence Wilson, Mary L. Jackson, Albert J. Stunkard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Experiences of obesity stigmatization and fear of fat, body image and self-esteem, were examined in relation to weight loss and weight maintenance. Participants in obesity treatment (N = 185) with more stigmatizing experiences had poorer body image and greater fear of fat. Higher initial BMI, more stigmatizing experiences, lower body dissatisfaction and greater fear of fat predicted greater weight loss. Higher initial BMI and more stigmatizing experiences predicted greater weight maintenance after six months in treatment. These findings suggest that despite the negative psychological correlates of stigmatization, experience and fear of obesity's negative consequences may also be associated with improved treatment outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-199
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Keywords

  • Body image
  • Obesity
  • Stigmatization
  • Weight loss
  • Weight maintenance

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