Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors

A. M. Laverman, J. S. Blum, Jeffra Schaefer, E. J P Phillips, D. R. Lovley, R. S. Oremland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3556-3561
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume61
Issue number10
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

arsenites
arsenates
arsenite
arsenate
Selenic Acid
selenate
selenates
electrons
Electrons
electron
Growth
Chromates
Thiosulfates
Fumarates
thiosulfates
trimethylamine
chromate
thiosulfate
Sulfides
Nitrites

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Laverman, A. M., Blum, J. S., Schaefer, J., Phillips, E. J. P., Lovley, D. R., & Oremland, R. S. (1995). Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors. Applied and environmental microbiology, 61(10), 3556-3561.
Laverman, A. M. ; Blum, J. S. ; Schaefer, Jeffra ; Phillips, E. J P ; Lovley, D. R. ; Oremland, R. S. / Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors. In: Applied and environmental microbiology. 1995 ; Vol. 61, No. 10. pp. 3556-3561.
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Laverman, AM, Blum, JS, Schaefer, J, Phillips, EJP, Lovley, DR & Oremland, RS 1995, 'Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors', Applied and environmental microbiology, vol. 61, no. 10, pp. 3556-3561.

Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors. / Laverman, A. M.; Blum, J. S.; Schaefer, Jeffra; Phillips, E. J P; Lovley, D. R.; Oremland, R. S.

In: Applied and environmental microbiology, Vol. 61, No. 10, 01.01.1995, p. 3556-3561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors.

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Laverman AM, Blum JS, Schaefer J, Phillips EJP, Lovley DR, Oremland RS. Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors. Applied and environmental microbiology. 1995 Jan 1;61(10):3556-3561.