Heat shock causes destabilization of specific mRNAs and destruction of endoplasmic reticulum in barley aleurone cells

F. C. Belanger, M. R. Brodl, T. H.D. Ho

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Abstract

In response to a phytohormone, gibberellic acid, the aleurone layers of barley seeds synthesize and secrete α-amylases, which are coded by a set of stable mRNAs. When aleurone layers are subjected to heat shock treatment, the synthesis of α-amylase is suppressed while heat shock proteins are induced. The suppression of α-amylase synthesis is not the result of translational control as reported in several other systems. Rather, the sequences of α-amylase mRNA are rapidly degraded during heat shock as shown by in vitro translation and dot blot hybridization, with a cDNA probe. Upon recovery from heat shock, the tissue resumes the synthesis of α-amylase in 2-4 hr. However, in the presence of a transcription inhibitor, cordycepin, the resumption of synthesis of α-amylase does not take place, indicating that new transcription of α-amylase genes is necessary for this recovery process. The degradation of α-amylase mRNAs correlates with the rapid destruction of endoplasmic reticulum as observed by electron microscopy, a phenomenon that has not been reported previously as a heat shock response. Since α-amylase mRNA is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum via membrane-bound polyribosomes, we suggest that the destruction of the endoplasmic reticulum during heat shock, causes the destabilization and the eventual degradation of α-amylase mRNA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1354-1358
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume83
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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