Heavy metals and selenium in Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) nesting in colonies from Eastern Long Island to Virginia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With increasing interest in assessing the health or well-being of communities and ecosystems, birds are being used as bioindicators. Colonially nesting species breed mainly in coastal areas that are also preferred for human development, exposing the birds to various pollutants. In this paper concentrations of heavy metal and selenium in the feathers of Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) nesting in several colonies from Massachusetts to Delaware are reported. There were significant differences among colonies for all metals, with metal concentrations being two to nearly five times higher at some colonies than others. Selenium showed the least difference, and cadmium showed the greatest difference among sites. Concentrations of lead were highest at Prall's Island; mercury was highest at Shinnecock, Huckleberry and Harvey, and manganese was highest at Captree.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-296
Number of pages12
JournalEnvironmental monitoring and assessment
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997

Fingerprint

Selenium
Birds
selenium
Heavy metals
heavy metal
Biomarkers
Metals
Cadmium
Ecosystems
bird
Manganese
Lead
metal
Health
feather
bioindicator
manganese
cadmium
pollutant
ecosystem

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Pollution
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Keywords

  • Bioindicator
  • Cadmium
  • Chromium
  • Feathers
  • Heavy metals
  • Herring gulls
  • Lead
  • Manganese
  • Mercury
  • Selenium

Cite this

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abstract = "With increasing interest in assessing the health or well-being of communities and ecosystems, birds are being used as bioindicators. Colonially nesting species breed mainly in coastal areas that are also preferred for human development, exposing the birds to various pollutants. In this paper concentrations of heavy metal and selenium in the feathers of Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus) nesting in several colonies from Massachusetts to Delaware are reported. There were significant differences among colonies for all metals, with metal concentrations being two to nearly five times higher at some colonies than others. Selenium showed the least difference, and cadmium showed the greatest difference among sites. Concentrations of lead were highest at Prall's Island; mercury was highest at Shinnecock, Huckleberry and Harvey, and manganese was highest at Captree.",
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