Hippocampus and Olfactory Discrimination Learning: Effects of Entorhinal Cortex Lesions on Olfactory Learning and Memory in a Successive-Cue, Go-No-Go Task

Tim Otto, Frank Schottler, Ursula Staubli, Howard Eichenbaum, Gary Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three experiments assessed the effect of entorhinal cortex lesions on olfactory learning and memory using a successive-cue olfactory discrimination paradigm. In contrast to the results of other studies that used a simultaneous-cue paradigm, lesions of the entorhinal cortex facilitated rats' acquisition of individual odor discrimination problems, with no impairment in memory for the individual odors across both short (24-hr) and long (65-day) retention intervals and despite limited training. When considered together with previous observations of facilitation or impairment in learning after damage to the hippocampal system, the present data suggest that the hippocampus is preferentially involved in encoding relations among multiple stimuli. By this account, facilitation of performance is due to an interaction between hippocampal system dysfunction and task conditions that hinder direct comparisons among cues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-119
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1991
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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