HIV-related risk behavior among Hispanic immigrant men in a population-based household survey in low-income neighborhoods of northern California

Vivian Levy, Kimberly Page-Shafer, Jennifer Evans, Juan Ruiz, Scott Morrow, Juan Reardon, Martin Lynch, H. Fisher Raymond, Jeffrey D. Klausner, Mathew Facer, Fred Molitor, Barbara Allen, Barbara Green Ajufo, Dennis Ferrero, Geneva Bell Sanford, Willi McFarland

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives/Goal: We compared risk behaviors and HIV testing between recent (in the U.S. <5 years) and established (in the U.S. >5 years) Hispanic immigrant men (N = 410). Study: This study was a population-based, cross-sectional survey of HIV/sexually transmitted disease markers and risk behaviors in men age 18 to 35 years residing in low-income census block groups in 3 northern California counties. Results: Recent immigrants were less likely to currently have a main sexual partner (45.3% vs. 67.2%, P <0.01)) and more likely to have ever used commercial sex workers (40.0% vs. 27.6%, P <0.01). Recent immigrants were less likely to receive medical care in the last 6 months (21.2% vs. 31.3%, P = 0.04) or had ever been HIV tested (26.0% vs. 43.3%, P <0.01). Established immigrants more likely reported unprotected sex, hallucinogen or ecstasy use. Conclusions: Recent Hispanic immigrants have less stable sexual partnerships and less health-seeking behavior, including HIV testing. Established immigrants report HIV test rates comparable to the national average.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-490
Number of pages4
JournalSexually transmitted diseases
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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