Hollow waveguides for the transmission of quantum cascade laser (QCL) energy for spectroscopic applications

James A. Harrington, Carlos M. Bledt, Jason M. Kriesel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spectroscopy in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelength region (8 to 12 μm) is useful for detecting trace chemical compounds, such as those indicative of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). To enable the development of field portable systems for anti-proliferation efforts, current spectroscopy systems need to be made more robust, convenient, and practical (e.g., miniaturized). Hollow glass waveguides have been used with a Quantum Cascade Laser source for the delivery of single-mode laser radiation from 9 to 10 μm. The lowest loss measured for a straight, 484 μm-bore guide was 0.44 dB/m at 10 μm. The smallest 300 μm-bore waveguide transmitted singlemode radiation even while bent to radii less than 30 cm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOptical Fibers, Sensors, and Devices for Biomedical Diagnostics and Treatment XI
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
EventOptical Fibers, Sensors, and Devices for Biomedical Diagnostics and Treatment XI - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 22 2011Jan 23 2011

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume7894
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

OtherOptical Fibers, Sensors, and Devices for Biomedical Diagnostics and Treatment XI
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period1/22/111/23/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Keywords

  • Infrared fiber optics
  • hollow waveguides
  • infrared spectroscopy
  • long-wave infrared (LWIR)

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