Holocene sea-level history and coastal evolution of the north-western Fenland, eastern England

David S. Brew, Benjamin Horton, Graham Evans, James B. Innes, Ian Shennan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Holocene relative sea-level reconstructions reveal spatial and temporal patterns, indicating the importance of regional- to local-scale processes for understanding coastal evolution. We reconstruct the Holocene sea-level history and coastal evolution of the north-western Fenland using detailed analyses of lithostratigraphy, microfossil (foraminifera and pollen) assemblages and a suite of 18 radiocarbon dates. We illustrate the balance between sea-level change, sedimentary palaeoenvironment and coastline movements. An initial transgression occurred c. 7700. cal. BP as sea level rose around 8. mm/yr, reaching its maximum inland extent c. 4150. cal. BP. As the rate of sea-level rise reduced to less than 2. mm/yr, a series of local regressive and transgressive phases followed. A regional transgressive event inundated much of the area after c. 2600. cal. BP. Salt marsh peat and intertidal mud dominate inland sequences whereas further seawards, intertidal and subtidal nearshore sand occur, comparable with modern sediments of the adjacent Wash embayment. The north-western Fenland sequence shows similarities with sequences in southern Fenland and The Wash, indicating some regional sea-level control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-85
Number of pages14
JournalProceedings of the Geologists' Association
Volume126
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology
  • Palaeontology

Keywords

  • Coastline changes
  • Foraminifera
  • Late quaternary
  • Sea-level change
  • Sediment supply

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