Human immunodeficiency virus 1-specific IgA capture enzyme immunoassay for early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection in infants

The Nyc perinatal HIV transmission study group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

A simplified human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HlV-l)-specific IgA capture enzyme immunoassay (IgA-CEIA) was evaluated and compared with IgA-Western blot assay for early - diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants born to seropositive women. A total of 232 coded sera collected prospectively from 70 infants were tested. All 25 sera from 10 HIV-1-negative infants born to seronegative mothers (negative controls) were negative by both assays. All 111 sera from 37 seroreverting, uninfected infants were negative by IgA-CEIA (specificity, 100%), whereas 110 of 111 sera were negative by IgA- Western blot assay (specificity, >99%). Overall IgA-CEIA detected HIV-IgA in 20 (87%) of 23 infected infants, and IgA-Western blot assay detected HIV-IgA in 21 (91.3%) of 23 infants; specimenwise agreement between the 2 assays was >80%. Analysis of results by age group indicated that after 2 months of age both assays were equivalent with sensitivity ranging from 60 to 80%. Quantitative data provided by IgA- CEIA suggests that the bulk of HIV-1 IgA synthesis in most HIV-l-infected infants occurs after 2 months of age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)908-913
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1993

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Keywords

  • Early diagnosis
  • Human immunodeficiency virus 1 IgA
  • IgA-capture enzyme immunoassay
  • IgA-western blot assay
  • Perinatal human immunodeficiency virus infection

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